Board index » delphi » Where is Prof. Nicklaus Wirth today?

Where is Prof. Nicklaus Wirth today?

Where is Prof. Nicklaus Wirth today? (The man who invented Pascal)
Thanks.
Gary.
 

Re:Where is Prof. Nicklaus Wirth today?


Quote
Gary Marcus wrote:

> Where is Prof. Nicklaus Wirth today? (The man who invented Pascal)

http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2926/tp.html
chapter "compiler" on page 1 has a link to his URL.

He is still professor on the ETH in Zrich.

Btw.: His{*word*128}name is Niklaus, not Nicklaus.

Franz Glaser

Re:Where is Prof. Nicklaus Wirth today?


In article <368D6744.B01D2...@eunet.at>, "Ing. Franz Glaser"

Quote
<meg-gla...@eunet.at> writes:
>Gary Marcus wrote:

>> Where is Prof. Nicklaus Wirth today? (The man who invented Pascal)

>http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2926/tp.html
>chapter "compiler" on page 1 has a link to his URL.

>He is still professor on the ETH in Zrich.

>Btw.: His{*word*128}name is Niklaus, not Nicklaus.

>Franz Glaser

Wasn't he at Dartmouth when inventing Pascal?  Or am I confused (I remember
Dartmouth Basic, running on an IBM 1130 with 16K of RAM, but I guess I'm dating
myself...).  Also, looks like Modula never really made it...
/js

Re:Where is Prof. Nicklaus Wirth today?


Quote
jefsumm...@aol.com (JefSummers) wrote:
>"Ing. Franz Glaser" <meg-gla...@eunet.at> writes:

>>Gary Marcus wrote:

>>> Where is Prof. Nicklaus Wirth today? (The man who invented Pascal)

>>He is still professor on the ETH in Zrich.

>>Btw.: His{*word*128}name is Niklaus, not Nicklaus.

>Wasn't he at Dartmouth when inventing Pascal?  Or am I confused (I remember
>Dartmouth Basic, running on an IBM 1130 with 16K of RAM, but I guess I'm dating
>myself...).

You're confused.  BASIC was created at Dartmouth in 1964 by John Kemeny and
Tom Kurtz, but Wirth was at ETH Zurich when he developed Pascal.  And
Modula.  And Oberon.

Quote
>Also, looks like Modula never really made it...

On the contrary.  While neither Microsoft nor Borland supplies a Modula
compiler, that is hardly the definition of "making it" for me.  Modula and
Oberon have a wide following.  A number of embedded systems use Modula
because of its type-safety.
--
- Tim Roberts, t...@probo.com
  Providenza & Boekelheide, Inc.

Other Threads