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Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State


2004-04-22 05:48:26 AM
delphi103
Kirk Halgren writes:
Quote
IIRC, PB was developed by a manufacturing company for its own
internal use, then sold outside that firm. SYBASE bought it later,
and initially users were concerned that PB would still work well with
other databases.
If I remember correctly, the DataWindow was developed by the company,
and then a group split off to write PowerBuilder. I think that it was
financed by a group of Cobol programmers who stayed with the company
and paid the salaries of the people who formed PowerSoft. They made out
pretty well.
--
Mike Swaim XXXX@XXXXX.COM at home | Quote: "Boingie"^4 Y,W & D
MD Anderson Dept. of Biostatistics & Applied Mathematics
XXXX@XXXXX.COM or XXXX@XXXXX.COM at work
Disclaimer: Yeah, like I speak for MD Anderson.
 
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

"John Kaster (Borland)" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes
Quote
Mark Van Ditta in <4086cdba$XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes:

Do you mean "spend the minimum amount of time" rather than "write the
minimum amount of code"?

The former is quick. The latter can be extremely time-consuming.

In this instance, "minimum amount of code" means the smallest amount of
non-optimized code needed to solve the problem. This approach means not
worrying about designing for future expansion on a version one product
because, in most cases, one's design choices end up being wrong.
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

BigJoey writes:
Quote
As always, I flip through the job sites today to see
what is going on in Delphi in the Tri-State area (CT,NJ,NY).
I am finally facing the facts that Delphi is heading for
it's eternal rest. Jobs are few are far between. Even those
that are posted frequently contain Delphi only 2nd or 3rd in relevance.

"All that glisters is not gold"
The latest and sexiest technologies always steal the job headlines. This
is why Borland must not shake too much of "we got legacy" support leg
and flaunt the "we're the best .NET solution on the market" leg. ("The
best .NET solution", not "a .NET solution.")
Keep flaunting VCL.NET as a solution to bring the old into the new
instead of pushing as an improvement on .NET as it was over Win32 and
compatible with existing code, and people will start thinking of it as
Visual COBOL. Putting "Visual" in front doesn't make it {*word*226}. And if
they start packaging better .NET components or solutions and begin to
freeze VCL.NET, then they end up looking like a component vendor with
their own IDE instead of a development tools company.
It's not impossible. It looks promising. But selling the soul of Delphi
so MS can make .NET isn't making things easy for their Borland
engineers. They do have the advantage of being the back seat driver
though. :)
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

Mark Van Ditta in <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes:
Quote
of non-optimized code needed to solve the problem. This approach
means not worrying about designing for future expansion on a version
one product because, in most cases, one's design choices end up being
wrong.
Thanks for the reply. So you meant the first option I listed.
In a requirements-driven project, initial design errors are
significantly minimized because a big part of the design is driven by
good requirements. The old adage "form follows function" comes to mind.
The problem is, the software industry rarely makes requirements-driven
applications.
--
John Kaster, Borland Developer Relations, bdn.borland.com
Add a feature/Fix a bug: qc.borland.com
Get source: cc.borland.com
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

"John Kaster (Borland)" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>wrote in news:4088851f$1
@newsgroups.borland.com:
Quote

In a requirements-driven project, initial design errors are
significantly minimized because a big part of the design is driven by
good requirements. The old adage "form follows function" comes to mind.
The problem is, the software industry rarely makes requirements-driven
applications.


After 30+ years of software development in which most of the projects were
chaotic, late, exceeded budgets, etc., I became an advocate of Requirements
driven development, the Rational Unified Process, and Critical Path project
management. After 10 years of that not working either I have come to the
conclusion that we simply do not know how to plan, estimate, and manage
software development in the same way that one manages a production process
or a construction project. Maybe I am the only one who fell asleep in class
when those items were being taught.
But during the last year I have been trying out one of the Agile
methodologies, SCRUM. And having some significant success with it. It
abandons the idea that we can preplan a software project in any significant
way because we generally do not know what is really required at the outset,
finding out what is required is a discovery process, and what is actually
required changes rapidly as our users receive initial versions of the
software. So the idea is to maintain a prioritized list of changing
requirements, focus on the subset that the team can design, implement, test,
and deliver in a 30-day time period, then bring in the requirements changes,
reprioritize, and do another "sprint". Our productivity has increased (I
would guess ~50%), the team is happier (they now get to focus without
outside disturbances, well, without many), and the users are happier because
they get working software early and often.
So, for those who have not investigated it, I commend SCRUM to you.
www.controlchaos.com/
-Larry Drews
-Manager of Applications Development
-Integrated DNA Technologies, Inc.
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

Larry Drews writes:
Quote
I have come to the
conclusion that we simply do not know how to plan, estimate, and
manage software development in the same way that one manages a
production process or a construction project. Maybe I am the only one
who fell asleep in class when those items were being taught.
I am in complete agreement with you. I wrote my master's thesis at the
Naval Postgraduate School on pretty much this exact topic, proposing a
methodology that /assumes/ we don't know where the project is going to
end up.
I studied these projects where the requirements were set in stone, and
the delivery date was scheduled /four years/ in the future. One would
think such a plan would be laughed out of the office, but instead, we
spend your hard earned tax dollars on such a ridiculous notion.
--
Nick Hodges -- TeamB
Lemanix Corporation -- www.lemanix.com
Read my Blog -- www.lemanix.com/nick
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

"Nick Hodges (TeamB)" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes
Quote

I am in complete agreement with you. I wrote my master's thesis at the
Naval Postgraduate School on pretty much this exact topic, proposing a
methodology that /assumes/ we don't know where the project is going to
end up.

What was your designator in the Navy (I am assuming that you were an
officer)?
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

Larry Drews in <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes:
Quote
But during the last year I have been trying out one of the Agile
methodologies, SCRUM. [snip]
What you describe afterwards sound a lot like how several of our
customers use CaliberRM. Requirements are dynamic. Furthermore, based
on what you describe, IMO ScRUM is still a requirements driven process.
Quote
So, for those who have not investigated it, I commend SCRUM to you.

www.controlchaos.com/
Thanks for the link.
--
John Kaster, Borland Developer Relations, bdn.borland.com
Add a feature/Fix a bug: qc.borland.com
Get source: cc.borland.com
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

"Nick Hodges (TeamB)" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes
Quote
<snip>master's thesis at the
Naval Postgraduate School <snip>
Do they teach lint there?
--
Clay Shannon,
author of the novel "the Wacky Misadventures of Warble McGorkle"
Now available on amazon.com: tinyurl.com/ysran
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

Sierra Spartacus writes:
Quote
Do they teach lint there?
No -- the Navel program was shut down in the 60's.
--
Nick Hodges -- TeamB
Lemanix Corporation -- www.lemanix.com
Read my Blog -- www.lemanix.com/nick
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

At 14:41:10, 24.04.2004, Nick Hodges (TeamB) writes:
Quote
No -- the Navel program was shut down in the 60's.
Did they also have navel oranges?
--
Rudy Velthuis (TeamB)
"Hemingway was a jerk."
- Harold Robbins
 

Re: Considering Mourning Delphi in Tri-State

Rudy Velthuis (TeamB) writes:
Quote
Did they also have navel oranges?
It was a full-encompassing navel program, yes.
--
Nick Hodges -- TeamB
Lemanix Corporation -- www.lemanix.com
Read my Blog -- www.lemanix.com/nick