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Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?


2006-08-25 04:15:52 PM
delphi84
Quote
I love it, but I suspect it is not to everyone's taste. The main thing I
like about it is the replacement of caps lock with control. You can
still get cap locks by holding down a function key.
I NEVER EVER in my whole live "used" the caps-lock key
wolf
 
 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

Quote
www.daskeyboard.com
Thats a fun idea, on the homepage it says :
"Like on a piano, since there are no keys to look at when typing, your
brain will quickly adapt and memorize the key positions. Within a few
short weeks users increase their typing accuracy and find themselves
typing up to 100% faster."
Would be interesting if that is true? I am not sure how often I have to
look onto my board but I learned typing in school on a typewrite with
a sheet of paper fixed on the keyboard to inhibit one from looking
down to the keys.
wolf
 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

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There are exactly two keyboard models for programmers: the original IBM
KATACHUNCK! deathbringer (another company builds it now, with the same
tools etc, and iirc with and without a Windows key). And the Cherry
G80-3000. Real gold plated switches, with and without click. Last for
decades even for {*word*155} coders. Not that fethishoid like the IBM axe,
but simply perfect. I know dozens of keyboard types, but I only use the
Cherry since at least 15 years. My second, I gave my first to a friend of
mine. I wanted one without a click. The first one works for him without
any problems.
I like Cherry keyboards as well - just the right amount of resistance
on the keys.
Cheers,
Chris
 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

Charles McAllister writes:
Quote
Wolfgang Lechner writes:
>Does anybody have experience with keyboards built for
>"heavy users". I am not sure what could be important for

me and a few of my colleagues really like this keyboard from saitek...
www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp

the keys have a soft touch, not too noisy.
Is that really a hacker board. "Enter" looks very small
wolf
 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

On 2006-08-24, Wolfgang Lechner <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes:
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Does anybody have experience with keyboards built for
"heavy users".
Yes, the original IBM PS/2 kbd. (in Dutch refered to as the "ramplank" which
translates as "ramming board" or something like that)
Quote
I'm not sure what could be important for programmers, maybe the resistance
of the keys or the position of "\" and "." and so one.
Robustness and the ability to clean it.
Quote
If anyone has a link to a manufacturer of good keyboards
or has experience in what is important, please let me know.
And best of all, they used to be Eur 2 on the avg garage sale. I bought
complete computers, and only took thet kbd.
 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

Wolfgang Lechner writes:
Quote
Would be interesting if that is true? I am not sure how often I have to
look onto my board but I learned typing in school on a typewrite with
a sheet of paper fixed on the keyboard to inhibit one from looking
down to the keys.
Way way back, when 468s were new, IBM keyboard keys had hats. the
keyboard underneath was little grey squares with light grey square hats
with the keys on so you could move them all around
I had done exactly that to annoy a co-worker who kept trying to use my
machine when I wasnt there and blame me for stuff. As by this point i
had learnt to touch type, I had no issues.. It was so funny to watch
them try though!
--
Liz the Brit
Delphi things I have released: www.xcalibur.co.uk/DelphiThings
 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

Hi!
Thank you, will give it a try.
Mike
Thomas Mueller <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes:
Quote
Hi Mike,

Mike writes:

>Yes, but we have the useless habit of wirting characters like
>??????and ?which are nothing different than ae, ue, oe
>.... in the end the two points above the vocal are what remained
>from the e above. This is why I like the English languge, the
>special characters can be accessed without Alt+Grrrrrrr...

Just switch your layout to UK and use Autohotkey to add the Umlauts to
(shift-)Alt-Gr-<umlaut>. Works fine for me.

twm

 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

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You like it? How's the feel compared to their earlier Natural model?
I've been a fan of Microsoft's Natural range of keyboards ever since they
were first released. My favourite keyboard at the moment is the 4000. The
feel is excellent, in my opinion, and the overall shape (in terms of the
curvature, etc) is even better than the older Natural Multimedia. Further,
they've eliminated the occasional key jam that the older keyboard suffered
from. For instance, on the Natural Multimedia, press the right Shift key
right on its edge - it sticks before going down. This is eliminated in the
4000.
One big disappointment though: they've dropped the more modern five-key
layout for those special keys in the middle (home, end, page up, etc) and
reverted to six keys, in the "traditional" layout.
To my mind, the five-key layout - as used in the Natural Multimedia
keyboard - is LOADS better. It gets rid of that pesky 'Insert' key which is
perilously close to the Backspace, and is utterly useless. How many times
do you really need to switch into Overtype mode?
The other nuisance is that it continues Microsoft's long tradition of having
dual purpose function keys, plus loads of other rubbish that I never use
along the top. That, however, is purely a personal thing and isn't really a
criticism. As far as I know it is not possible to buy a Natural-style
keyboard without all the extra keys.
So, apart from the dreaded Insert key making a reappearance, if you like the
old Natural keyboard you will love the 4000.
Thack
 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

"Staiger" <XXXX@XXXXX.COM>writes:
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So, apart from the dreaded Insert key making a reappearance, if you like the
old Natural keyboard you will love the 4000.

Thack
I've used the Natural Multimeda keyboard for a couple years, and still love it. Microsoft does have a tool to help you remap the keys, but it is a little incomplete, it't at:
*The Microsoft Keyboard Layout Creator*
www.microsoft.com/globaldev/tools/msklc.mspx
Googled for this one today, but haven't tried it myself:
*KeyTweak Homepage*
webpages.charter.net/krumsick/
Maybe you could remap the Insert key to be a "dead" key.
Have to admit that the typematrix 2030 that Brian Moelk linked to looks like it makes sense.
 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

Bob S writes:
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Googled for this one today, but haven't tried it myself:
I found this one a while back, which seems to work alright:
www.randyrants.com/sharpkeys/
Using this is much easier than the manual registry hacking that I
blogged about.
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Maybe you could remap the Insert key to be a "dead" key.
Yes, I believe you can.
Quote
Have to admit that the typematrix 2030 that Brian Moelk linked to
looks like it makes sense.
Just remember that I use the 2020 and that I think the 2030 has the
fundamental flaw of lowering the control/alt keys too low on the left
hand side.
I suppose this is ok for average computer users, but for software
developers not having an easily accessible ctrl key is insane. IOW,
this is my disclaimer: if you buy the 2030 and hate it because the ctrl
key is too low on the left hand side, don't blame me. ;)
--
Brian Moelk
Brain Endeavor LLC
XXXX@XXXXX.COM
 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

The Microsoft one won't let you change any of the Insert/Delete/Home etc
keys. However, the Sharpkeys works just fine.
This greatly reduces the grumble I had about the 4000. Now I can recommend
it even more enthusiastically!
Thack
 

Re: Keyboard purpose-built for programmers?

Bob Dawson writes:
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You like it? How's the feel compared to their earlier Natural model?

I've used ergos for a couple of years and would never go back to a
non-split board.
You can have my 4000 when you pry it from my cold, dead hands. Or
maybe when the next great keyboard arrives from MS, we'll have to see.
It takes a little bit to get used to because they've added a slight
curve to the keys, but after that, you will not want to live without
it. Less of problem than getting used to the split, but they keys
being off just a smidge takes a bit of getting used to.
I've tried typing shifted 1 key over, but the new changes make it so
that within 3 or 4 keystrokes I am guided right back to the correct
keys without even thinking about it.
It's very comfortable to work with and feels very right in a very short
period of time.
--